Thursday, October 30, 2008

Charts


I found this great chart over at Calculated Risk and thought I'd post it here for discussion.

Here is a chart of the TSX as well. As of market close on October 27, the TSX was down 43.3% from its June 18th peak. In terms of speed of the crash, the TSX kicks butt on the S&P500 with a 43% fall in only 20 weeks.

7 comments:

Metaldwarf said...

I like the chart of the SP-500.

I have previously seen, but can no longer find, a chart of the last 100 or so years of the stock market ( I think the TSX, but might be DOW)
It showed all of the bull and bear markets over the last 100 or so years. The interesting thing about the chart was that each beginning of a cycle was reset to 0. You had bull markets in blue rising above the center line, and bear markets in red dropping below. The thing I liked the most about the chart is that is very effectivly shows that bear markets, on average, are only 1/3 as deep, and only last 1/3 as long as the bull markets.

Does anyone know the chart I'm speaking of and know where to find it?

macho slob said...

Don't know about the TSX, but you can find charts for the DOW that go back to 1900, and for the S&P 500 that go back to 1960 on stockcharts.com
hit "free charts" and then "historic charts".

Sam said...

that makes sense in general, because surely over time, the companies that remain listed are the ones that grow and are profitable, and the ones that fail or were flawed are delisted.

???

sutluc said...

http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/10/10/how-long-before-the-market-bottoms/

Gives some idea what may happen.
So does the nikkei index.

patriotz said...

So much for the $XXX trillion derivative doomsday scenario:

it successfully closed out over $500 billion in market participants’ exposure from the Lehman Brothers, Inc. (Lehman) bankruptcy which occurred the week of Sept. 22. This was the largest close-out in DTCC’s history. DTCC reports it does not expect there to be any impact to its retained earnings or to market participants’ clearing fund deposits as a result of closing out these pending trade obligations.

Prefblog commentary

Ms. Nocente said...

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2008/10/11/business/20081011_BEAR_MARKETS.html

This might the chart you are thinking about

Ms. Nocente said...
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